Indoor Planting and Care for Chrysanthemums

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Chrysanthemums, also called mums, are one of the most popular fall flowers. They come in a wide range of colors, including white, yellow, pink, purple, and red. Chrysanthemums are known for their showy flowers and long-lasting blooms. If you’re looking for a beautiful flower to add to your indoor décor this fall, consider planting chrysanthemums.

How to Care for Chrysanthemums

How to Care for Chrysanthemums

In this article, we’ll give you some tips on how to care for chrysanthemums indoors, so you can enjoy their beauty all season long. When choosing a chrysanthemum plant for your home, look for one that has healthy-looking leaves and stems. Avoid plants that have wilted or yellowed leaves, as these may be indicative of disease. It’s also important to choose a plant that is the right size for your space. Chrysanthemum plants can range from 6 inches to 4 feet tall, so be sure to select one that will fit comfortably in the area where you plan to place it.

Prepare for Planting Chrysanthemums

Prepare for Planting Chrysanthemums

Once you have chosen a healthy plant, it’s time to prepare for planting. To start, find a pot that has drainage holes and is large enough to accommodate the root ball of your chrysanthemum plant. Fill the pot with potting mix or all-purpose garden soil and water it thoroughly before planting. When you’re ready to plant, remove the chrysanthemum plant from its store-provided container and gently loosen the roots with your fingers. Place the plant in the center of the pot and backfill with soil until it’s level with the top of the root ball. Water the plant again and allow it to drain before moving it to its final location.

Provide Your Chrysanthemums with Proper Light

Proper Light

Chrysanthemum plants prefer bright indirect sunlight, so choose a spot near a window that receives plenty of light throughout the day. Once you have found the perfect location, water your chrysanthemum deeply and regularly during its blooming period (usually late summer through early fall). Allow the soil to dry out slightly between watering to prevent root rot. If you want to keep your chrysanthemum blooming throughout the winter, you can try providing additional light with a grow light. Place the light about 6 inches above the plant and leave it on for 12-14 hours per day. Keep an eye on the plant and adjust the light as needed to prevent the leaves from burning.

Growing Your Chrysanthemums Indoors

Growing Your Chrysanthemums Indoors

To encourage bushy growth and lots of flowers, pinch back newly emerging stems by about half their length when they are 4-6 inches tall. Pinching back also helps to promote lateral branching, which results in a fuller plant. You can also remove any spent flower heads throughout the blooming period to encourage continued flowering. Once your chrysanthemum has finished blooming, cut back the stems to about 6 inches above the soil line. This will encourage new growth and prevent the plant from becoming leggy. Water is needed to keep the soil moist but not soggy. With proper care, your chrysanthemum should bloom again in 6-8 weeks.

The Importance of Properly Fertilizing Indoor Chrysanthemums

Properly Fertilizing Indoor Chrysanthemums

Mums are heavy feeders, meaning they require more nutrients than other plants to grow and produce beautiful blooms. The best way to provide these nutrients is through a fertilizer specifically designed for flowering plants. You can find fertilizer for mums at most garden centers or online. When applied correctly, fertilizer will help your mums grow strong roots, foliage, and flowers.

When selecting a fertilizer for your mums, look for one with a high phosphorus content. Phosphorus is essential for flower production, so this will ensure that your mums bloom abundantly. You can also use a general-purpose fertilizer that is balanced between nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium (the “NPK” on the fertilizer label). Avoid using strictly nitrogen-rich fertilizers as too much nitrogen will encourage leafy growth at the expense of flowers.

It’s also important to consider the type of fertilizer you use. Granular fertilizers are easy to apply but can be difficult to control when it comes to indoor plants. If you opt for a granular fertilizer, be sure to apply it sparingly and water thoroughly after application to avoid burning the roots of your mums. Another option is liquid fertilizer, which can be easily diluted and applied with a watering can or hose-end applicator. This type of fertilizer is less likely to burn the roots of your plants and is ideal for indoor use. Whichever type of fertilizer you choose, always follow the manufacturer’s directions carefully to avoid over or under-fertilizing your mums.

The Best Time to Fertilize Your Mum

The Best Time to Fertilize Your Mum

You should start fertilizing your indoor mums about two weeks after they have been transplanted into their final pots or containers. At this point, they should have settled into their new home and begun putting out new growth. Once your mums start actively growing again in springtime, continue fertilizing them every two weeks until flowers begin to form (usually around early summer). Once the buds have started to develop, discontinue fertilizing until after the blooming period has ended in late fall. Resume fertilizing every two weeks until winter sets in and growth slows down again. By following this schedule, you will give your mums the nutrients they need throughout the entire growing season!

Other Tips for Indoor Chrysanthemum Care

In addition to using a fertilizer specifically designed for flowering plants, there are a few other things you can do to help ensure abundant blooms on your indoor mums:

1. Water regularly. In addition to fertilizing, mums need consistent watering to stay healthy and bloom well. Allow the top 1-2 inches of soil to dry out between waterings, and be sure to empty any saucers or catch trays that collect underneath pots to prevent root rot.

2. Encourage good air circulation. Stagnant air can promote fungal diseases, so be sure to provide plenty of airflow around your mums. Use a fan to circulate the air in your grow space, and avoid overcrowding plants to prevent disease problems.

3. Deadhead spent blossoms. The term “deadhead” refers to cutting dead blooms off at the stem. This will encourage the plant to produce more flowers.

Care for Indoor Chrysanthemums – The Wrap-up

With proper care, your indoor chrysanthemum plant will provide plenty of beautiful fall color for several weeks (or even months). Enjoy your lovely bloom all season long!

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